Globalisation and the welfare state

A new focus paper published by Bertelsmann Stiftung's GED projectsuggests that the complementarity between openness to trade and a strong welfare state weakened over time. While trade – the key driver of globalisation – improves net welfare, it comes with increased vulnerability to external shocks, decline of certain sectors of the economy, etc. In order to insure against these side-effects, a strong welfare state is needed. However, while globalisation is accelerating, the welfare state stagnates.

Globalization.  Photo copyright: Woplu on flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Globalization.  Photo copyright: Woplu on flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

French elections: at best a a Pyrrhic victory for the French economy

In this new blogpost CASE economist Iakov Frizis analysis the victory of Emmanuel Macron in the french presidential elections and the upcoming political and economic challenges.

French flags. Picture copyrighs: Quinn Dombrowski on flick (CC BY-SA 2.0)

French flags. Picture copyrighs: Quinn Dombrowski on flick (CC BY-SA 2.0)

SUMMER SCHOOL ON "PERSPECTIVES ON REGULATORY COOPERATION"

The Summer School on “Perspectives on Regulatory Cooperation” is organized by the Collegio Carlo Alberto. The course programme is designed to explore the normative questions raised by the emergence and the crisis of regulatory spaces that go beyond the State. The School offers participants the possibility to critically engage with mechanisms that promote regulatory cooperation across borders, the interaction between public and private bodies, their impact on democratic decision-making and on the safeguard of competing interests and values. All these issues are examined by looking both at the EU and at the international legal order, as well as from a comparative perspective.

Speakers: 

  • Alberto Alemanno (HEC Paris and NYU)
  • Marija Bartl (Amsterdam University)
  • Giacinto della Cananea (University of Rome Tor Vergata)
  • Daniele Gallo (LUISS)
  • Lawrence Gormley (University of Groningen)
  • Luis Hinojosa (University of Granada)
  • Claire Kilpatrick (EUI)
  • Fernanda Nicola (American University Washington)
  • Harm Schepel (Kent University)

Europeans rediscover enthusiasm for globalisation

New research by  Uuriintuya Batsaikhan and Zsolt Darvas.
The general political mood on both sides of the Atlantic seems to suggest declining public support for globalisation, but people in the EU increasingly see globalisation as an opportunity for economic growth. This shift in public opinion coincides with improved economic conditions.

"Globalisation as an opportunity for economic growth". Blue: EU north (Finland, Germany, Denmark, Ireland, Netherlands, Sweden, United Kingdom) Red: EU west (Austria, Belgium, Luxembourg) Orange: EU south (Cyprus, Italy, Greece, Spain, Portugal) Green: EU east 11 (Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovenia Slovakia) Pink: France.

Source: Eurobarometer. Question: Please tell me to what extent you agree or disagree with the following statement: “Globalisation is an opportunity for economic growth”. Share of those respondents who replied “Totally agree” and “Tend to agree” among those who answered this question. Average of the May and November survey results for each year.

Vision Europe representative at FEMISE Annual Conference

Hugo de Seabra, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Project Manager for Vision Europe, presented at the FEMISE (Forum Euro-Méditerranéen des Instituts de Sciences Economiques) annual Conference, on 29 April, the Vision Europe 2016 conclusions and recommendations following the publication “Improving the Responses to the Migration and Refugees Crisis in Europe”, dedicating special attention to the Conference Declaration “Building Common Ground: Towards strategic migration and refugee policies in Europe”.

Speakers at FEMISE Annual Conference. 29-30 April 2017, Casablanca. Copyright: FEMISE

Speakers at FEMISE Annual Conference. 29-30 April 2017, Casablanca. Copyright: FEMISE

The FEMISE annual conference “Migration and Refugees’ Crisis in the EU – Med: Dawn of an Era of Shared Responsibility?” was held in Casablanca from 29 to 30 April 2017.

Trump Trade: More bark than bite?

In this policy paper, Elvire Fabry, senior research fellow at the Jacques Delors Institute, analyses the factors that will prevail in Washington’s initiatives et outlines two scenarios allowing to decipher the way in which these various parameters might be played out:
• An aggressive economic nationalism;
• A protectionist megaphone with limited disruption.

Times Square, USA. Picture copyright: cgc76 on flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Times Square, USA. Picture copyright: cgc76 on flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Follow-up Conference in Berlin

60 representatives from academia, civil society, politics and administration continued the discussions started in Lisbon. Following an invitation by the Bertelsmann Stiftung, the round table started with an input by Matthias Ruete, Director General at DG Migration and Home Affairs, who emphasized the interconnectedness of national and European policies. Germany’s past and future role for a proactive, efficient and fair asylum policy was then discussed by high-level panelists.

From left to right: Eric Thode (Director, Bertelsmann Stiftung), Aart De Geus (CEO, Bertelsmann Stiftung), Michael Tetzlaff (Head of Directorate, Directorate for Migration, Refugees, European Harmonisation, Federal Ministry of the Interior), Matthias Ruete (Director-General of Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, European Commission), Thomas Oppermann (Chairman of the SPD Parliamentary Group), Katharina Lumpp (Representative of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Germany), and Ulrich Kober (Director, Bertelsmann Stiftung).

From left to right: Eric Thode (Director, Bertelsmann Stiftung), Aart De Geus (CEO, Bertelsmann Stiftung), Michael Tetzlaff (Head of Directorate, Directorate for Migration, Refugees, European Harmonisation, Federal Ministry of the Interior), Matthias Ruete (Director-General of Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, European Commission), Thomas Oppermann (Chairman of the SPD Parliamentary Group), Katharina Lumpp (Representative of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Germany), and Ulrich Kober (Director, Bertelsmann Stiftung).

The Treaty of Rome at 60

The 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome presents an opportunity to reflect on the progress of European integration so far, and to discuss what the future will bring for Europe. Bruegel explores these topics in their special edition of The Sound of Economics.

Brussels - 20. Image copyright: Matt May on flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Brussels - 20. Image copyright: Matt May on flickr (CC BY 2.0)

On the Economics of an EU-Japan Free Trade Agreement

A new study of the ifo Institute on behalf of Bertelsmann Stiftung shows that both the EU and Japan could gain additional benefit from a free trade agreement. More importantly, however, the agreement would signal a clear commitment to economic cooperation and free trade in the era of Brexit and Trump.

Japan. Image copyrights: Moyan Brenn on flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Japan. Image copyrights: Moyan Brenn on flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Study: Social harmonization in the eyes of Polish Stakeholder

Aspects of labor mobility and discrepancies in social benefits schemes in Member States became an urgent matter to address. However, the EU propositions faced a strong resistance from some groups of stakeholders and Member States. CASE held a forum with various Polish stakeholders, where CASE experts gathered views on the future of social situation in the EU. They are all summarized in this Policy Brief.

Working. Image copyright: Katy Warner on flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Working. Image copyright: Katy Warner on flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)